Color: Mottled grayish brown
Size: ¾”
Shape: Triangular
Wings: Yes
Legs: 6
Antennae: Yes
Region: Found throughout the United States

About Stink Bugs

The Stink Bug is fairly new to the United States after introduction from Eastern Asia in the 1990’s. It is an invasive species that gets its name from the odor it releases when it is disturbed or when crushed. The Stink Bug was first collected in 1996 in PA but did not officially become identified until 2001.

Stink Bugs are only active from spring to late fall as they go dormant during the cold winter months. During those active months, they can reproduce up to three times depending on their location. In cooler zones, only once but in warmer zones 2-3 times. Female Stink Bugs lay 20-30 eggs at a time. They are green and barrel shaped and stored underneath their host plants leaves. The eggs only need 4-5 days before they hatch, then the nymphs begin to feed and grow and become mature by the fall.

Adult Stink Bugs feed on fruit while the nymphs feed on steams, leaves and fruit. When winter starts to approach, the Stink Bugs seek shelter in warm places like wall voids and attics in our homes. When the warmer winter days appear, the Stink Bug can get confused and come out of hibernation causing homeowners distress as their homes become overrun with Stink Bugs.

Stink Bugs cannot sting, and they will not likely bite, but be sure to take caution when handling these bugs as the odor they emit is not pleasant. As well as not being a harm to humans, they do not cause structural damage or spread disease.

 

Stink bugs can migrate to homes in large numbers in the fall.  Pest Professionals will use a product like Bifen and treat sunny surfaces of the house and around windows and doors.  This product is effective for 30 – 60 days.