Ant Control Products, Poisons, Sprays and More

Ant Control Products. Ant poisons, Ant Baits, do it yourself ant control products. Whether you have fire ants, carpenter ants or any other type of ant, we have ant control products for you. Of the approximately 600 native species of ants in the United States, around 40 species infest structures and less than 10 species are considered major pests. 

Pavement Ant.
Carpenter Ants
Pavement-Ants.
Pavement Ant
Argentine Ant.
Argentine Ant

Featured Products for Ant Control

Carpenter Ants and Ant Control

Color: red to black

Size: 5/8”

Legs: 6

Antennae: Yes

Shape: Segmented; Oval

Found: Throughout the United States, most common in the North

Pavement Ant.
Carpenter Ants
Identifying Characteristics:
Carpenter ants have a one-segmented petiole in the form of a vertical scale, and a terminal acidopore with a circular orifice fringed with hairs. The workers are polymorphic and characterized by their evenly convex thoracic dorsum. 
Distribution:
Various species of carpenter ants are distributed throughout the U.S. ranging from sea level to higher than 9,000 feet. 
Biology and Habits:
Carpenter ants enter buildings to nest or forage. They are called “carpenters” because they excavate their nests in wood, creating smooth tunnels and galleries. They generally excavate in wood that is decayed or damaged by other insects. Carpenter ant colonies are established after the mating flights of winged male and female reproductive. The nuptial flights usually begin during the first warm days of spring. After mating, the male dies. In most species, the colonies are monogyny and begin from a single queen. She often starts the nest in a small cavity in a dead or live tree where she lays her first eggs. In two to three weeks, the eggs hatch into larvae that are fed by the queen. At the end of larval development, they pupate and later emerge as minor workers, numbering 10 to 25 individuals. The minors begin foraging, excavating, and brood rearing for the colony. Mature, or parent colonies, establish satellite colonies nearby whenever a need exists for more territory, more resources, or a drier, warmer nesting site for development of their larvae and pupae. The queen, workers and small larvae are always present in the parent colony whereas the satellite colonies contain workers, larger larvae, and pupae. Parent colonies containing the queen, workings, winged reproductive, and larvae overwinter in a metabolic state termed diapause. In temperate regions, diapause is a period of dormancy during which the ants are in a state of “suspended animation”. The encasing wood of the colony’s residence provides them with insulation from cold temperatures. In addition, larvae, workers and reproductives have glycerol, a compound that acts as antifreeze. Since carpenter ants are primarily  nocturnal, they rely heavily on physical cues and chemical trails for orientation to and from the nest. In structural infestations of carpenter ants, the parent colony is generally located outside in a tree, stump, stack of firewood, or landscape logging. In a tree, nests are frequently located in hollows or dead limbs. Satellite colonies may be found in similar sites in one or more neighboring trees and in adjacent structures. Such colonies may be found in a variety of places, including attic rafters, roof overhangs, bay windows, fascia boards, floor joists, box headers, wall voids, hollow curtain and shower rods, hollow doors or columns, behind dishwashers, under or behind insulation in attics and crawlspaces, bath traps, under cabinets, and in ceiling voids next to skylights and chimneys. A parent colony found inside is typically associated with a water lead or other constant source of moisture. A house built on the outskirts of town in a woodland habitat is a prime candidate for carpenter ant infestation. The numerous trees, landscape timbers, wooden porches and fences, and bay or box windows are all potential “hot spots”. Leaky pipes or roofs, clogged gutters and chimneys with improperly fitted flashing can create moisture problems which attract carpenter ants. Homes with flat roofs, dormers or hollow porch columns are potential sites for infestation. Often, moisture damage, especially in a void space, is an open invitation for a carpenter ant infestation. Multiple roof lines, if not sealed properly and adequately ventilated, often lead to moisture damage in the attic. Carpenter ant control is notoriously costly and often frustrating. Indeed, professionals consider carpenter ants to be the most frequently encountered and problematic of all the ant pests.  Check out our ant control products, these are the same ones professionals use.

Pavement Ants

Color: dark brown to black

Size: 1/8”

Legs: 6

Antennae: Yes

Shape: Segmented; Oval

Found: Throughout the United States

Identifying Characteristics:
The workers are 2.5 to 3mm long and monomorphic (one size). They have a two-segmented petiole and a stinger. It is not known, however, if they can bite or sting. Their antennae are 12 segmented with a three segmented club. The propodeum has a pair of small spines. The head and thorax are sculptured with numerous parallel grooves. The body color varies from light to dark brown to blackish. Queens have a similar appearance but are larger (6mm). Pavement ants move slowly.
Distribution:
Its range includes most of the U.S. and it is particularly common along the West Coast. In the Northeast and Midwest, it is the number one ant pest in commercial buildings. 
Biology and Habits:
The pavement ant derives its name from its habit of nesting beside and under sidewalks, driveways, and foundation. New colonies are established after mating flights that usually take place in the spring but may occur at other times of the year if the ants are nesting indoors. The alates typically emerge from under baseboards, expansion joints, or from floor registers connected to heating ducts. In commercial buildings, they often become a nuisance when the alates emerge from openings in the walls above false ceilings, then drop into the rooms below. This activity may go on for weeks as more alates emerge. Nests are located in soil in the open or under stones and pavement, and in masonry or rotting wood. The ants usually leave conspicuous piles of excavated soil. during winter, they will move inside, preferable to be near a heat source such as radiator or heating duct. Pavement ants tend homopterans for honeydew, especially subterranean forms, and feed on live and dead insects and a variety of plants. As household pests, they are attracted to both greasy and sweet foods. 
Check out our ant control products, these are the same ones professionals use.
Pavement-Ants.
Pavement Ant

Argentine Ants

Color: Dark brown to a black shiny

Size: 1/16”-1/4”

Shape: Segmented, Oval

Legs: 6

Antennae: Yes

Found: Southeastern United States

Argentine Ant.
Argentine Ant
Identifying Characteristics:
The workers are 2.2 to 2.8mm long and have a one-segmented petiole. Their antennae are 12 segmented without a club. The body varies in color from light to dark brown, with the legs somewhat lighter. The mandibles are yellowish and dentate. They cannot sting. The workers emit a musty odor when crushed. The queens are brown, 4 to 6mm long, and recognized by their large size. The queens perform other duties besides laying eggs, such as foraging. The winged males are dark brown and 2.8 to 3mm long. 
Distribution:
The Argentine ant is distributed worldwide. It was probably introduced into the U.S. at New Orleans in the late 1800s on ships transporting coffee from Brazil. It is now established throughout the South, California, and Hawaii. It is also found in Arizona, Missouri, Illinois, Indiana, Maryland, Oregon, and Washington. 
Biology and Habits:
Populations of Argentine ants lack colony borders, sometimes extending over entire habitats. The colony has tremendous capacity for growth and expansion due to the numerous queens and splintering off of new colonies. The population can reach astronomical proportions. A colony typically consists of 10% queens and 90% workers. Virgin queens do not leave the nest on mating flights. Instead, they mate within the nest and begin new colonies with a number of workers and males that bud off the parent colony. Males either mate with virgin queens in their own nest or leave on mating flights to find virgin queens to mate with in other nests. The Argentine ant life cycle consists of four main stages: egg, larva, pupa and adult. The egg, larval and pupal stages are hidden within the underground nest and are only seen when nests are disturbed or when workers are carrying them to a different location. The microscopic eggs are white and approximately .3mm long. Although queens lay eggs throughout the year, most of them are laid in spring and summer. The incubation period varies depending on the temperature from 12 to 55 days with an average of 28 days. The length of time spent in the larval and pupal stages also varies depending on temperature. Following the four larval instars, the larvae molt into pupae, which look like adults except that their legs and antennae are held tightly against the body. These pupae are initially white, but begin to turn darker as they mature. In the final molt, the pupa becomes an adult ant. The time needed to complete the cycle from egg to adult ranges from 33 to 141 days, with an average of 74 days. Typically the nests are shallow, but in dry soils, they can be as deep as 60cm. In the urban environment, outside nests are located beneath boards, stones, concrete, and within decaying plant matter and mulch. Nests are often found at the base of plants or trees that are infested. Indoors, nests are occasionally found in wall voids, bath traps, and insulation. Homeowners sometimes complain of massive numbers of dead ants found in unexpected places, such as the bathtub. 
Argentine Ants do not pose a threat to humans, just that they are dirty insects that can transport bacterial disease if crossed with human food that is then consumed. 
Check out our ant control products, these are the same ones professionals use.

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